Tag Archives: Special Collections

Behind The Veil & Life Inside The Jim Crow South

Behind The Veil ~ Duke University

The Devil’s Tale, Duke University’s Special Collections blog announced yesterday that 310 oral history interviews from the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture have been added to the Behind the Veil Digital Collection.

From The Devil’s Tale:

The addition to the collection documents the lives of African Americans from the state of North Carolina who lived through the era of Jim Crow in the Charlotte, Durham, Endfield, New Bern and Wilmington areas. The digitization efforts were made possible by the Triangle Research Libraries Network’s Content, Context and Capacity grant project to document the Long Civil Rights Movement in the state. Researchers now have access over 400 digitized interviews from the collection from states throughout the American South.

Given my Ancestors descended from Alabama (maternal-paternal) and Georgia (maternal-maternal) before migrating to Ohio, hearing the first person accounts of those who endured will be enlightening.

It’s exciting to see so much of our history emerging online. We live in a very special day and time!

Might  be time for me to make another onsite visit to the Rubenstein Research Library at Duke. I’m curious to see what’s contained in the 42 narratives that are considered “closed” and not online.

Luckie

FOOTNOTE:


Rare Historical Find! Liljenquist Civil War Photographs Collection ~ Library of Congress

Liljenquist Collection - Unidentified African American soldier in Union Zouave uniform

If you haven’t seen the AMAZING collection of Civil War images donated to the Library of Congress in 2010 by the Liljenquist Family, you are missing a historical treat!

The Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs contains 1220+ ambrotypes and tintypes portrait photographs capturing both Union and Confederate soldiers during the American Civil War (1861-1865), including many portraits of African American Soldiers!

The Liljenquist Collection Summary:

More than 1,000 special portrait photographs, called ambrotypes and tintypes, represent both Union and Confederate soldiers during the American Civil War (1861-1865). The photographs often show weapons, hats, canteens, musical instruments, painted backdrops, and other details that enhance the research value of the collection. Among the most rare images are sailors, African Americans in uniform, Lincoln campaign buttons, and portraits of soldiers with their families and friends.

Tom Liljenquist and his sons Jason, Brandon, and Christian built this collection in memory of President Abraham Lincoln and the 620,000 Union and Confederate servicemen who died in the American Civil War. For many, these photographs are the last known record we have of who they were and what they looked like. See “From the Donor’s Perspective–The Last Full Measure” for the full story.

The Liljenquist Family began donating their collection to the Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division in 2010 and continues to add to it. In addition to the ambrotypes and tintypes, the collection also includes several manuscripts, patriotic envelopes, photographs on paper, and artifacts related to the Civil War.

Take your time and go through the collection. You never know when you might find a long, lost Ancestor.

Luckie

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